Tom Dick and Harry Mountain Hike

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Overview

Trail Features

Dogs
Allowed
Fees
Yes
Kids
Allowed
Route
Out and Back
Users
Hikers Only
Length
7.6
Parking
Yes
Surface
Dirt and Rock
Bathrooms
Yes
Elevation
1,600 foot gain
Difficulty
Intermediate
Trail hours
All
Parking hours
All
Water fountains
None
Vending machines
None

The beautiful vista at the summit of the Tom Dick and Harry Trail makes the hike well worth it, but because of this it is quite popular! For this reason, arriving early or on a weekday may be a wise choice. The trail follows Mirror Lake Trail, which provides an excellent view of Mt. Hood, and then continues to the top of Tom Dick and Harry Mountain. From the top you can take in the view of Mt. Hood and the thick forest below. On a clear day you can catch a glimpse of Mt. St Helens, Mt. Rainier, and Mt. Adams. While the trail up is a climb, it is well spaced out and an intermediate hike. The trail does have moments of slight exposure, but many kids can be seen making the climb. A Northwest Forest Pass is required from May 15th through October 1rst. Passes are available through National Forest Centers or online, with a day pass optional online for printing at home.

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Description

The Tom Dick and Harry Trail begins by following Mirror Lake Trail. There is a new paved parking area with bathrooms, but note that the trail does require a Northwest Forest Park pass to park there. The trail is paved at first with switchbacks down towards Camp Creek. After crossing the creek, the trail becomes a dirt trail to Mirror Lake. You will notice the forest growing dense as you cross several footbridges and switchbacks on your way towards the lake. The elevation gain is moderate, and this 2.25 mile section of the trail is very kid-friendly.

The trail next offers a loop around Mirror Lake. Taking a left around the loop adds a little length to the trip, but the area can be a nice resting spot to take a break or eat a quick snack. Head right if you’re looking for the most direct route. You will walk to the right of the lake and see a wooden sign for Tom Dick and Harry Mountain just as the trail begins to curve around the south side of Mirror Lake. The Tom Dick and Harry Trail is narrower than the Mirror Lake Trail, and also a bit steeper. However, there are often families with children completing the hike.

The summit is 3.8 miles away, but in the early summer the area is filled with wildflowers, including rhododendrons, bear-grass, lupine, Indian paint brush, avalanche lilies, and others. There are plenty of great vistas featuring Mt. Hood and the forest. At 3.3 miles there is a large rock cairn marking the start to the final ascent. The final half mile is gradual, but ends with a final push up a steep and rocky section. At the top, take in views of the Salmon-Huckleberry Wilderness, Mt. Hood and Mirror Lake, and on clear days, several other Mountains. You will also likely see ground squirrels and pikas playing off the trail along the way. From here, just head back down the way you came to finish, stopping as needed to take in any final views.

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History

Tom Dick and Harry Mountain is technically a foothill of Mt. Hood, receiving its name because of its three different peaks. Originally referred to as Tom Dick, the Board of Geographic Names decided to include Harry in 1969, thus making it a play on the saying “Tom, Dick, and Harry.”

On top of the peak you’ll be able to look over the Salmon-Huckleberry Wilderness to the South. The area was designated as a wilderness area in the Oregon Wilderness Act of 1984, one of 23 new designated areas including over 70 miles of hiking trails and important fish-bearing creeks draining into the Clackamas River and Salmon River. The area is marked by dense forests, some including original growth areas protected from previous fires. The area began as 44,600 acres, but the wilderness has expanded to 61,340.

To the North you will have a great view of the Mt. Hood National Forest, including Mt. Hood. The mountain was named by British Lieutenant William Broughton in 1792, after a famous British naval officer. The area was inhabited by The Molalas, Kalapuyans, Chinookan Clackamas, Shinookan Wascos, and the Northern Paiute peoples, many who called the Mountain Wy’East Mountain. This wilderness area goes back to 1893, taking its official name in 1924. Mt. Hood National Forest also includes the infamous Timberline Lodge, built in 1937.

Sources

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